A Grand Rehabilitation

I have an old polo coat that I love. It weighs ten tons, is warm as all heck, and I wear it about once a year, when I’m traveling somewhere cold in the winter. It cost me about $30 on eBay (though I think it took another $25 to get it to me), and it was originally made around 1930 for Capper & Capper, a competitor to Brooks Brothers.

Sadly, while the camelhair exterior was holding up strong, the rayon lining was starting to be a bit worse for the wear. As most 80-year-olds do. I thought initially of taking it to my tailor and having him reline it, which probably would have cost a hundred or a hundred fifty dollars, but would have made it good for another fifty or so years of service. That was the plan, for a while.

Then I remembered that I had a closet full of silk scraps - odds and ends from our pocket square fabric that weren’t quite big enough to constitute a full square. I thought of how much I love patched out blue jeans, and wondered if this might be an opportunity for a creative solution.

Above: the result. Rather than replacing the lining, we patched it with fabric leftover from Put This On pocket squares. We were careful to preserve the tags, too - those old tags are one of the best parts of a vintage garment. The result is a very serious and hard-working coat on the exterior, with a beautiful secret inside.

I was struck by how spectacularly beautiful this tie, available in our friend Will’s A Suitable Wardrobe store, is.  It’s also quite expensive at $135, but Will is nothing if not principled.  His idea of compromising on cost is to use WW Chan for his summer bespoke suiting instead of Savile Row.  We love him, still. Especially for refusing to sell anything but accessories in his store, because he believes in his heart of hearts that a well-dressed man’s sized clothing should be made especially for him.
The fabric this tie is made from is called shantung.  It’s a type of heavy-weight, nubby silk.  This texture is perfect for summer, when traditional silk ties can seem a bit stiff and shiny.  It’s a lovely compliment to cotton or linen suits and coats.  What I really love, though, about the tie is the palette - grounded by oxblood, those ivory and gold stripes really pop, but without the slightest feeling of ostentation.

I was struck by how spectacularly beautiful this tie, available in our friend Will’s A Suitable Wardrobe store, is.  It’s also quite expensive at $135, but Will is nothing if not principled.  His idea of compromising on cost is to use WW Chan for his summer bespoke suiting instead of Savile Row.  We love him, still. Especially for refusing to sell anything but accessories in his store, because he believes in his heart of hearts that a well-dressed man’s sized clothing should be made especially for him.

The fabric this tie is made from is called shantung.  It’s a type of heavy-weight, nubby silk.  This texture is perfect for summer, when traditional silk ties can seem a bit stiff and shiny.  It’s a lovely compliment to cotton or linen suits and coats.  What I really love, though, about the tie is the palette - grounded by oxblood, those ivory and gold stripes really pop, but without the slightest feeling of ostentation.