Packing for a One-Week Trip to the UK
I’m headed to the UK later today to do a few comedy shows. Folks are always emailing for examples on how to pack a decent wardrobe, so I thought I’d share what I’m bringing. All of this fits comfortably a carry-on bag (or on my back), along with socks, underwear, a dopp kit and a couple of soft white t-shirts to sleep in.
I’ll be casually dressed in the UK, and while the weather’s pleasantly warm in London at the moment, it’s still a bit cool and damp at night; in my other destination, Edinburgh, it’s actually a bit cold. I won’t be doing laundry on this trip.
All the pieces above go together and can be switched out for each other or layered, and the shoes are comfortable for walking. Those, along with “fits in luggage” are my main criteria when packing for a trip.
Coats
I’m bringing a leather A-1 jacket and a workwear-ish cotton blazer. The leather’s fine in actual cold, especially layered, and the blazer I can wear whenever it’s not actually hot hot.
Shirts
I brought two t-shirts and five oxfords. I love oxfords for travel because they look great right out of my suitcase - slightly rumpled is their natural state. The t-shirts will be great if there are particularly warm days.
Trousers
I brought two pairs of jeans, though I often bring only one, simply because I had the room. I also brought a pair of khakis for warmer days or days when I want to look a bit more put-together.
Shoes
I ended up bringing two pairs of sneakers on the trip. It’s always a good idea to have backup shoes in case of soaking or blisters or what-have-you, and canvas sneakers aren’t too heavy. If it weren’t summer, I’d likely bring a pair of boots and a pair of sneakers.
Etc.
I grabbed an Ebbets Field Flannels 8-panel cap, which is soft and packs easily, along with a favorite gray sweatshirt (for layering) and a white silk scarf that will keep me warm on the way to my 11PM gig in Edinburgh. Hopefully.

Packing for a One-Week Trip to the UK

I’m headed to the UK later today to do a few comedy shows. Folks are always emailing for examples on how to pack a decent wardrobe, so I thought I’d share what I’m bringing. All of this fits comfortably a carry-on bag (or on my back), along with socks, underwear, a dopp kit and a couple of soft white t-shirts to sleep in.

I’ll be casually dressed in the UK, and while the weather’s pleasantly warm in London at the moment, it’s still a bit cool and damp at night; in my other destination, Edinburgh, it’s actually a bit cold. I won’t be doing laundry on this trip.

All the pieces above go together and can be switched out for each other or layered, and the shoes are comfortable for walking. Those, along with “fits in luggage” are my main criteria when packing for a trip.

Coats

I’m bringing a leather A-1 jacket and a workwear-ish cotton blazer. The leather’s fine in actual cold, especially layered, and the blazer I can wear whenever it’s not actually hot hot.

Shirts

I brought two t-shirts and five oxfords. I love oxfords for travel because they look great right out of my suitcase - slightly rumpled is their natural state. The t-shirts will be great if there are particularly warm days.

Trousers

I brought two pairs of jeans, though I often bring only one, simply because I had the room. I also brought a pair of khakis for warmer days or days when I want to look a bit more put-together.

Shoes

I ended up bringing two pairs of sneakers on the trip. It’s always a good idea to have backup shoes in case of soaking or blisters or what-have-you, and canvas sneakers aren’t too heavy. If it weren’t summer, I’d likely bring a pair of boots and a pair of sneakers.

Etc.

I grabbed an Ebbets Field Flannels 8-panel cap, which is soft and packs easily, along with a favorite gray sweatshirt (for layering) and a white silk scarf that will keep me warm on the way to my 11PM gig in Edinburgh. Hopefully.

Q & Answer: What Shoes Should I Bring On Vacation?

Ben writes: This May, my wife and I are honeymooning in Europe for two weeks. I know that I will be doing a heavy amount of walking. Do you have any suggestions for footwear that will allow me to keep pace with my wife without looking like the ugly American?

Packing shoes for a trip - especially one that requires more than one level of formality - is always tough. When I travel, I fight not to bring more than two pairs of shoes, with one of those pairs on my feet. I don’t always win the fight.

I’ve got plenty of dress shoes that are perfectly comfortable, but none that I’d want to walk miles in. So if I’m bringing a pair of dress shoes to make a big presentation or what-have-you, I’m usually looking to compliment them with a “walking shoe.”

Depending on the season and context, that usually boils down to one of two things: a simple sneaker, or a comfortable boot.

I actually own the Grenson chukka boots pictured above, in a slightly darker brown. I find they work great with jeans or khakis, though I obviously wouldn’t wear them with shorts were I headed somewhere hot. In fact, they’re sort of a three-season shoe - fine anytime but summer. Sometimes I’ll substitute the chunkier, hardier Alden Indy Boot for these. Most importantly, I can put in a few miles on these, and be happy to see them the next day.

I also frequently bring sneakers on trips that will involve walking. As usual, I’d say the simpler the better. Above are a classic, the Adidas Samba. I usually wear Common Projects, which are great but expensive. I’m hoping Kent Wang gets in a full size run of his plain white sneaks soon. And of course if it’s summer, there’s stuff like Jack Purcells and Supergas, among others.

Traveling’s really an exercise in building a capsule wardrobe. You want to carry as few pieces as possible, and have as much interchangability as possible. So: keep it simple, and you’ll be fine.

Traveling with a Suit

I’m on a trip right now and I hate packing large bags when flying. I just don’t trust checking my luggage. Plus, carrying a heavy bag while trying to catch your transfer isn’t fun. 

So, I carry my briefcase and a small weekend bag for most trips. I stuff it with the usual — shirts, socks, an extra tie and of course underwear — but there is one thing I don’t try to pack away: my suit. 

Instead, I prefer to travel while wearing it. While most fliers like to wear “relaxed” clothing, I think wearing the suit makes more sense. You don’t have to fold it up and worry about setting it aside to let the wrinkles fall out. The extra pockets are great for carrying your stuff, like tickets, phone and wallet.

Typically, I wouldn’t recommend wearing the same suit several days in a row. But if it’s for the occasional trip, the convenience of not having to pack anything but a shirt a day can’t be beat. 

If you’re worried about creases in your suit from sitting for several hours in an airplane seat, I haven’t found it to be too much of a problem if you place your suit on a hangar and let it hang in the shower with hot water running to steam the wrinkles out. It should only take 10-15 minutes. 

If you can get away with it and your trip is short enough, try traveling light and in a suit. 

-Kiyoshi

Traveling with a Suit

I’m on a trip right now and I hate packing large bags when flying. I just don’t trust checking my luggage. Plus, carrying a heavy bag while trying to catch your transfer isn’t fun.

So, I carry my briefcase and a small weekend bag for most trips. I stuff it with the usual — shirts, socks, an extra tie and of course underwear — but there is one thing I don’t try to pack away: my suit.

Instead, I prefer to travel while wearing it. While most fliers like to wear “relaxed” clothing, I think wearing the suit makes more sense. You don’t have to fold it up and worry about setting it aside to let the wrinkles fall out. The extra pockets are great for carrying your stuff, like tickets, phone and wallet.

Typically, I wouldn’t recommend wearing the same suit several days in a row. But if it’s for the occasional trip, the convenience of not having to pack anything but a shirt a day can’t be beat.

If you’re worried about creases in your suit from sitting for several hours in an airplane seat, I haven’t found it to be too much of a problem if you place your suit on a hangar and let it hang in the shower with hot water running to steam the wrinkles out. It should only take 10-15 minutes.

If you can get away with it and your trip is short enough, try traveling light and in a suit.

-Kiyoshi

Our friend PG pretty much nails it here. Perfect travel wardrobe.
mostexerent:

* What I packed for a 2 week business trip. Again, uncovered from my archives by another new follower. (Oct 2010)
Packed to be suited for 14 days..
Covering the following climates, Singapore averaging 30c + 100%, Beijing averaging 5c-10c, Hong Kong averaging 15c then back to Sydney.
I will be expected in suits most days.
Packing includes:
5 x white English-Italian spread collar shirts
3 x random patterned button down shirts
1 x navy S120 wool suit
1 x grey + light blue window pane S120 wool suit
1 x navy tropical weight wool/silk suit
1 x grey tropical weight wool/silk pantaloons
1 x navy cotton chino
1 x khaki cotton chino
1 x RAW denim jean
3 x silk ties (predominant in navy)
2 x knit ties (orange & blue)
socks & underwear
1 x black leather punch cap toed oxford shoe
1 x brown leather punch cap toed oxford shoe
1 x brown belt
1 x black belt
1 x navy cashmere v/neck sweater
1 x mid-grey cashmere v/neck sweater
1 x chocolate herringbone weave cashmere top-coat
1 x pair of wool gloves
toiletries
“Baby Boston” Porter x Monocle bag in case of.. 
All in a 30” hard case Globe-Trotter - see you all in 12 hours.

Our friend PG pretty much nails it here. Perfect travel wardrobe.

mostexerent:

* What I packed for a 2 week business trip. Again, uncovered from my archives by another new follower. (Oct 2010)

Packed to be suited for 14 days..

Covering the following climates, Singapore averaging 30c + 100%, Beijing averaging 5c-10c, Hong Kong averaging 15c then back to Sydney.

I will be expected in suits most days.

Packing includes:

  • 5 x white English-Italian spread collar shirts
  • 3 x random patterned button down shirts
  • 1 x navy S120 wool suit
  • 1 x grey + light blue window pane S120 wool suit
  • 1 x navy tropical weight wool/silk suit
  • 1 x grey tropical weight wool/silk pantaloons
  • 1 x navy cotton chino
  • 1 x khaki cotton chino
  • 1 x RAW denim jean
  • 3 x silk ties (predominant in navy)
  • 2 x knit ties (orange & blue)
  • socks & underwear
  • 1 x black leather punch cap toed oxford shoe
  • 1 x brown leather punch cap toed oxford shoe
  • 1 x brown belt
  • 1 x black belt
  • 1 x navy cashmere v/neck sweater
  • 1 x mid-grey cashmere v/neck sweater
  • 1 x chocolate herringbone weave cashmere top-coat
  • 1 x pair of wool gloves
  • toiletries
  • “Baby Boston” Porter x Monocle bag in case of.. 

All in a 30” hard case Globe-Trotter - see you all in 12 hours.

How I Travel
I travel a lot for both work and pleasure, and in my time traveling, I’ve learned one cardinal rule: pack as light as possible. These days, I try to only bring a carry-on and one personal item (my briefcase, which always contains my laptop and some reading material). In my carry-on is a small set of clothes – two grey trousers, four light blue or white shirts, one navy sweater, and a sport coat. I find that this is enough to get me through a few days before having to do laundry, especially since we’re not also counting the clothes I’m wearing onto the plane. Other things, such as shaving razors, soaps, and shampoos, can always be bought at the destination.
I like bringing a few superfluous things that make the trip more pleasant, however. For one, instead of wearing a sport coat onto the plane, I use a travel jacket I bought from Herno. It looks a bit like this one from Woolrich, but it has a hidden zippered pocket and no epaulets. Zippered and snap button pockets are useful for making sure things don’t accidentally slip out when you take off your jacket and carelessly carry it around. The idea of being in a foreign country and suddenly realizing that you’ve lost your papers, credit cards, and money just seems really, really bad. So I wear a travel jacket. Woolrich and Boggi have one this season (you may need to call Boggi’s actual stores to order), but you could also just wear anything lightweight and of a similar design. Just search around for “field jackets.”
I also use a travel wallet. These help keep my important documents and cards all in one place – passport, green card, identification papers, credit cards, health insurance card, boarding pass, and little slips of paper on which I’ve jotted down my hotel, flight, and train information. Having them all in one place gives me a peace of mind and some convenience. Many airports these days have multiple checkpoints where you have to show your papers to some official, so it’s convenient to have them ready and on hand. My travel wallet is by Chester Mox, who is running a Father’s Day promotion until Thursday, but you can also find some nice ones by Saddleback, Aspinal of London, Filson, and Tanner Goods.
There are a few other things I find helpful. Sleeping pills can get you through a long flight, but they also leave you feeling drugged. So instead, I eat Tianwang Buxin Wan, an all-natural, root-based pill that relaxes me enough to go sleep. It’s great on the plane and for when I’m trying to recover from jet lag. I also wear Bose noise cancelling headphones that a friend generously gifted me, and either soft suede driving shoes or a pair of canvas plimsolls. Feet tend to swell up during flight, which makes wearing hard bottom leather shoes extremely uncomfortable. Even if you take off your shoes, your feet can swell so much that they can be hard to put back in. Should you find yourself in such a situation, I recommend using my credit card trick.
And that’s basically how I travel - a carry on and my briefcase, along with a travel jacket, travel wallet, pair of soft shoes, and some things to help me go to sleep. These are enough to get me through fifteen to twenty hour travel schedules and still land in reasonably good form. 
(Pictured above: My travel jacket, travel wallet, and laptop at JFK airport)

How I Travel

I travel a lot for both work and pleasure, and in my time traveling, I’ve learned one cardinal rule: pack as light as possible. These days, I try to only bring a carry-on and one personal item (my briefcase, which always contains my laptop and some reading material). In my carry-on is a small set of clothes – two grey trousers, four light blue or white shirts, one navy sweater, and a sport coat. I find that this is enough to get me through a few days before having to do laundry, especially since we’re not also counting the clothes I’m wearing onto the plane. Other things, such as shaving razors, soaps, and shampoos, can always be bought at the destination.

I like bringing a few superfluous things that make the trip more pleasant, however. For one, instead of wearing a sport coat onto the plane, I use a travel jacket I bought from Herno. It looks a bit like this one from Woolrich, but it has a hidden zippered pocket and no epaulets. Zippered and snap button pockets are useful for making sure things don’t accidentally slip out when you take off your jacket and carelessly carry it around. The idea of being in a foreign country and suddenly realizing that you’ve lost your papers, credit cards, and money just seems really, really bad. So I wear a travel jacket. Woolrich and Boggi have one this season (you may need to call Boggi’s actual stores to order), but you could also just wear anything lightweight and of a similar design. Just search around for “field jackets.”

I also use a travel wallet. These help keep my important documents and cards all in one place – passport, green card, identification papers, credit cards, health insurance card, boarding pass, and little slips of paper on which I’ve jotted down my hotel, flight, and train information. Having them all in one place gives me a peace of mind and some convenience. Many airports these days have multiple checkpoints where you have to show your papers to some official, so it’s convenient to have them ready and on hand. My travel wallet is by Chester Mox, who is running a Father’s Day promotion until Thursday, but you can also find some nice ones by Saddleback, Aspinal of London, Filson, and Tanner Goods.

There are a few other things I find helpful. Sleeping pills can get you through a long flight, but they also leave you feeling drugged. So instead, I eat Tianwang Buxin Wan, an all-natural, root-based pill that relaxes me enough to go sleep. It’s great on the plane and for when I’m trying to recover from jet lag. I also wear Bose noise cancelling headphones that a friend generously gifted me, and either soft suede driving shoes or a pair of canvas plimsolls. Feet tend to swell up during flight, which makes wearing hard bottom leather shoes extremely uncomfortable. Even if you take off your shoes, your feet can swell so much that they can be hard to put back in. Should you find yourself in such a situation, I recommend using my credit card trick.

And that’s basically how I travel - a carry on and my briefcase, along with a travel jacket, travel wallet, pair of soft shoes, and some things to help me go to sleep. These are enough to get me through fifteen to twenty hour travel schedules and still land in reasonably good form. 

(Pictured above: My travel jacket, travel wallet, and laptop at JFK airport)

Put This On Season 2, Episode 1: The Melting Pot

Q & Answer: How to Fold and Pack a Suit

In our Q & Answer segment, find out how to pack your suit for travel. We’ll show you a fold to keep it neat inside a rolling carry-on or suitcase, and we’ll show you how to keep your trousers on the hanger inside a garment bag.

Put This On Season Two, Episode 1: The Melting Pot

Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits New York City, a place where style is defined and redefined through interpretation and reinterpretation.

Meet the ‘Lo Heads. With roots in 1980s street gangs, these Polo Ralph Lauren enthusiasts have made “aspirational apparel” a lifestyle. They once had to boost their Polo from stores and fight to keep it on the streets. Today, their culture is worldwide, promulgated by hip-hop. Their hero is Ralph Lauren - a working class New Yorker who understood that the fantastical power of style can be transformative. Dallas Penn from The Internets Celebrities, a dedicated Lo Head with a collection of over 1000 pieces of Polo apparel (and former member of the Decepts crew) takes us on a tour of this remarkable fashion subculture.

Visit Worth & Worth hat shop, a New York institution with roots going back to 1922. In recent memory, Orlando Palacios has made the shop a home for rockers as well as traditionalists, turning hundred-year-old machines to the task of reinterpreting hundred-year-old styles.

Meet Jason Marshall, a jazz saxaphonist with a classic style. He plays with bands ranging from traditional bop to hip-hop fusion to Aretha Franklin, but he prefers to wear tailored clothes when he does it, and explains why.

And in our Q & Answer segment, find out how to pack your suit for travel. We’ll show you a fold to keep it neat inside a rolling carry-on or suitcase, and we’ll show you how to keep your trousers on the hanger inside a garment bag.

This is the first episode in our six-episode second season. We’ll visit the three greatest men’s style cities in the world, as chosen by our readers - New York, Milan and London. Stay tuned for our next New York episode, coming soon to putthison.com.



This episode was supported by our viewers and by Lifeway Kefir.

Executive Producers: Jesse Thorn & Adam Lisagor

Director: Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Host / Writer / Producer: Jesse Thorn

Producer: Andrew Yamato

Director of Photography: Ryan Samul

Sound: Andrew J. Reardon

Production Assistance: Zach Linder, Derek Miller